Cotton On wants sweat shops in New Zealand as well as overseas.

I have been looking for a long time, scouring the shelves, watching out on face book, hearing stories, and facing disappointment on a regular basis.  I had begun to doubt my sanity, surely I must have found it by now.  This elusive treasure that I have been seeking is chocolate milk, no ordinary chocolate milk however, Lewis Road Creamery Whittakers Chocolate Milk no Lewis roadless.Whittakers has been in business since 1896.  A New Zealand owned and operated company that has shown remarkable growth over the past few years.  It is a family owned company which for its size is an unusual thing in this day and age.  It has produced iconic products for a very long time, they have however in more recent years gone through a purple patch. It wasn’t new products, a new marketing product, a change in pricing, merely sticking to a tried and true product.  Their main competitor

Decided to change a recipe for their product and use an inferior component that changed the taste and feel of their chocolate, they did this to increase their profit, purely and simply, this multi-national company were dealt a salutary lesson and handed a lions share of the market to their competitor and Whittakers has never looked back, yes the company changed back to their old recipe but rather too late the gate had been opened.  Cadbury had taken themselves down a slippery slope.  It was not that Whittakers are adverse to change, witness their association with Lewis Road Creamery, and their new chocolate flavours such as L&P. They knew that quality sells. Such a lesson whittakers l&Pshould be studied at many different levels in society, not just business.  The Cadbury decision to go to an inferior, cheaper product that is also arguably environmentally unsound smacks of arrogance, possibly the company thought if they went down this line others would follow, or that people who ate chocolate were undiscerning and would not notice, or they traded on company loyalty.  Whatever it was they clearly were mistaken and got hit hard in their bottom line and eventually capitulated and changed their recipe back.  The lesson was brought home by that which seems a most effective encouragement, it cost them money, the approbation of the environmental activist groups did not move them, the chorus of concern about the taste, nothing, but hit them in the pocket book, voila!

From this we learn a powerful lesson, every purchase we make is a decision and it has potential to make an impact, personally, provincially, professionally, at so many levels.  I try to be cognisant when I make purchases, New Zealand mad, sustainable, local, people I know, these are all influences that I consider when making a purchase, sometimes these things are dictated to me by resources, (yes money), I only have so much to go around so sometimes.

I often wonder about the effect that I have on society, how my actions can have influence, a friend of mine is having a tough time at the moment, I asked him if there was anything I could do for him, his remark humbled me and at the same time validated what I do, he said keep writing. Hence this missive, it has been percolating for a few days in what I intended to share, a couple of different drafts sit in my partially written file, and the truth is this started somewhere different, I am asking you to consider a form of action.  Cotton On are the first company who are attempting to take away the rights of workers to tea breaks and meal breaks. Not for reasons of safety or uninterrupted production, the only reason is that they must believe that they can profit from this.  Profit is the only driver of this action, and the potential loss of profit is the only thing that can stop this see here for an outline of the situation, http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/67486113/cotton-on-staff-should-say-no-to-tea-break-loss-michael-woodhouse.

I shall write more on this in the next few days, in the meantime please consider carefully before you buy anything from Cotton On,

Paul

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